Go Back   The 75 and ZT Owners Club Forums > The 75 and ZT Owners Club Forums > The 75 and ZT Owners Club General Forum
Register FAQ Image Gallery Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read
Notices

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 14th May 2022, 16:20   #1
Wicksie
Newbie
 
Rover 75 saloon

Join Date: Apr 2021
Location: Bracknell
Posts: 16
Thanks: 0
Thanked 14 Times in 3 Posts
Default Recent cam belt change and comment on "cheap tooling"

Just completed a cambelt change on my 75 auto and thought members might be interested in my findings.
Firstly, I have never done a floating cam 3 belt belt before so was very careful to research it properly, looked at all the info I could find before hand and bought a set of tooling on the Bay for the princely sum of £48
The tooling - in short it did the job but you get what you pay for, one of the spigot pins fell out after use and had to be locktighted back in, the tensioner retaining pin was non tensile wire and bowed during use and the secondary sprocket holding tool was bowed and made it quite hard to hold the two secondary sprockets together whilst tightening the bolts ( the exhaust cam locating dogs barely made contact on one side because of the bow)
These defects can all be sorted if I use it again but bear it in mind folks these cheap kits are of less than "professional quality" and you might need a hydraulic press to straighten the secondary sprocket tool, a substitute tensioner retainer and locktight to hold errant spigot pins in place.
To the actual belt change - it went quite well but two things stand out.
One - My car is an early one and it has the old type of oil cooler, I found it necessary to remove this, disconnecting the rear oil pipes and the coolant hoses, to access the A/C pump bolts.
Two - I think the old primary belt had been fitted wrongly. It was quite slack between the two sprockets,so much so that the water pump pully could be freely rotated against the belt. Anyway the new belt went on and with bolts tightened correctly and tensioner fitted, it manually rotated one tooth back on the rear sprocket marks that I had made as a precaution
The engine has now done about 100 miles and seems to have gained more torque, it changes up at noticeably lower revs and is as smooth as ever in cruise
Overall, the job is challenging, particularly in gaining access and the number of parts you need to remove but greatly satisfying when it stars an runs properly at the end.
PS. how experts such as Tom manage the job in a shift is beyond me - This old codger took over a week!
Wicksie is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 8 Users Say Thank You to Wicksie For This Useful Post:
Old 14th May 2022, 18:40   #2
Wicksie
Newbie
 
Rover 75 saloon

Join Date: Apr 2021
Location: Bracknell
Posts: 16
Thanks: 0
Thanked 14 Times in 3 Posts
Default wrong section

Sorry folks just realised this post is in the V8 section and I am talking about a V6 - what a doughnut!!
Wicksie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 14th May 2022, 19:13   #3
stevestrat
This is my second home
 
ZT260 #243 (resting)

Join Date: May 2010
Location: Prestonpans
Posts: 20,822
Thanks: 595
Thanked 4,371 Times in 3,189 Posts
Default

Send one of the Mods a PM and they'll move it for you.
__________________
Steve


T4 Location Map
stevestrat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15th May 2022, 05:25   #4
Pete
Owners Club Director
 
Pete's Avatar
 
Rover 75

Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Sherfield-on-Loddon
Posts: 4,507
Thanks: 110
Thanked 737 Times in 376 Posts
Default

Thread moved to General Forum
__________________


Follow The Club On Twitter
Pete is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15th May 2022, 09:10   #5
SD1too
Doesn't do things by halves
 
SD1too's Avatar
 
Rover 75 2.5 Connoisseur Auto (1999) Dealer launch model.

Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Middlesex
Posts: 18,984
Thanks: 1,494
Thanked 3,629 Times in 3,076 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wicksie View Post
Just completed a cambelt change on my 75 auto and thought members might be interested in my findings.
Thanks very much David for your very useful post. I too have the original oil cooler and recall having to disconnect it as you have described.

I agree with your warning about cheap, unbranded tooling from eBay. The kits by Laser, Sealey and Sykes Pickavant are considerably more expensive but pay in the long run.

The slack primary belt that you found could have been due to incorrect setting of the tensioner pulley. As you know, this can easily be done if the subject isn't fully researched beforehand.

By the way, when removing your rear belts, did you find that you had to remove the "flywheel" locking pin and turn the engine slightly in order to line-up the rear sprockets and fit the removal tool?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wicksie View Post
PS. how experts such as Tom manage the job in a shift is beyond me - This old codger took over a week!
Whilst I know that familiarity with a task enables it to be completed more quickly, as you rightly say this is a challenging procedure and no shame should be attached to taking your time. A cautious approach and attention to detail will repay you during the rest of your KV6 ownership.

Simon
__________________
"Whatever is rightly done, however humble, is noble."
Sir Henry Royce.
SD1too is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15th May 2022, 14:55   #6
Wicksie
Newbie
 
Rover 75 saloon

Join Date: Apr 2021
Location: Bracknell
Posts: 16
Thanks: 0
Thanked 14 Times in 3 Posts
Default

Yes there was a bit of "jiggling" involved to get the tool to fit but after final secondary bolt tightening I rotated the engine twice and the safe mark and and secondary cam marks all lined up OK.
Wicksie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16th May 2022, 15:03   #7
DMGRS
Discount MG Rover Spares
 
DMGRS's Avatar
 
MG ZT + ZTT - both CDTi Auto

Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Hythe, Southampton
Posts: 11,067
Thanks: 453
Thanked 3,298 Times in 1,996 Posts
Default

We found the same with the tooling kit - in the end we opted for a Sealey kit to rent out to members for this reason (charged at £50 per 14 day rental period).

That said, I did use an old kit I found in the garage which I believe was an 'eBay special' from many years ago - and while the fit and finish was pretty poor it did help to get the job done a lot easier than it would have been by hand.
__________________



Your trusted MG Rover specialist!
Tel: 02380 001133 / Email: sales@dmgrs.co.uk

Full Metal KV6 Thermostat Kits now stocked! Click Here

Remember - discount code FORUM5 for 5% off
DMGRS is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16th May 2022, 15:27   #8
dave lincs
Posted a thing or two
 
Rover 75 Saloon

Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Louth
Posts: 1,071
Thanks: 324
Thanked 802 Times in 402 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wicksie View Post
Just completed a cambelt change on my 75 auto and thought members might be interested in my findings.
Firstly, I have never done a floating cam 3 belt belt before so was very careful to research it properly, looked at all the info I could find before hand and bought a set of tooling on the Bay for the princely sum of £48
The tooling - in short it did the job but you get what you pay for, one of the spigot pins fell out after use and had to be locktighted back in, the tensioner retaining pin was non tensile wire and bowed during use and the secondary sprocket holding tool was bowed and made it quite hard to hold the two secondary sprockets together whilst tightening the bolts ( the exhaust cam locating dogs barely made contact on one side because of the bow)
These defects can all be sorted if I use it again but bear it in mind folks these cheap kits are of less than "professional quality" and you might need a hydraulic press to straighten the secondary sprocket tool, a substitute tensioner retainer and locktight to hold errant spigot pins in place.
To the actual belt change - it went quite well but two things stand out.
One - My car is an early one and it has the old type of oil cooler, I found it necessary to remove this, disconnecting the rear oil pipes and the coolant hoses, to access the A/C pump bolts.
Two - I think the old primary belt had been fitted wrongly. It was quite slack between the two sprockets,so much so that the water pump pully could be freely rotated against the belt. Anyway the new belt went on and with bolts tightened correctly and tensioner fitted, it manually rotated one tooth back on the rear sprocket marks that I had made as a precaution
The engine has now done about 100 miles and seems to have gained more torque, it changes up at noticeably lower revs and is as smooth as ever in cruise
Overall, the job is challenging, particularly in gaining access and the number of parts you need to remove but greatly satisfying when it stars an runs properly at the end.
PS. how experts such as Tom manage the job in a shift is beyond me - This old codger took over a week!
Well done on getting it done it does not matter if it took you a week (It has taken some people much longer to do it) at least you now know it is done for the next 6 years
dave lincs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16th May 2022, 15:47   #9
shiner
Regional Secretary London South & West
 
shiner's Avatar
 
75

Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Reading
Posts: 1,032
Thanks: 384
Thanked 164 Times in 120 Posts
Default

Done some a few weeks back 12k miles from new but original belts. I guess some would still perhaps risk them but at 16 years old, wasn't risking it.
As for how long it takes heard some have taken months. 4.5 hrs taking it carefully, constant methodical working gets it done

Sent from my CPH2371 using Tapatalk
__________________

Andy
T4.KV6 belt special tools
[2002 MG ZT 2.5 177 manual Starlight silver
2004 MG ZT-T 1.8T 160 manual green
shiner is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to shiner For This Useful Post:
Old 21st May 2022, 03:41   #10
Rich in Vancouver
Gets stuck in
 
Rich in Vancouver's Avatar
 
MG ZT-T

Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: White Rock, BC on Canada's Pacific Coast
Posts: 718
Thanks: 317
Thanked 336 Times in 198 Posts
Default

I have used my "Budget" tool kit a few times now and have had to file various bits of it for fit. I last used it this spring and decided to modify it to work more like the factory kit by cutting the hex ends off the front holding tools and making up a separate cam turning tool. This makes the tools much easier to mount on the cams and avoids the fear of damaging the ends of the cams with the tools. I also invested in a set of 190 adaptors which didn't fit the cheap tools properly and involved yet more tool filing. They did the job though.

Here are the modified tools with my homemade turning tool at the rear.

__________________
ZT-T190, Midnight Blue, LHD, Left the Line on June 24, 2002,
Sold new in Switzerland, spent time in Germany, Imported to Canada in September 2021

Last edited by Rich in Vancouver; 21st May 2022 at 03:48..
Rich in Vancouver is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 02:12.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright © 2006-2022, The Rover 75 & MG ZT Owners Club Ltd